Neyland Stadium

Home of the Tennessee Vols

With a seating capacity of 102,455 Neyland Stadium is one of the most impressive stadiums in college football and comes in ranked as the fifth largest stadium in the country. Mainly used as the home field for the University of Tennessee football team it is one of the crown jewels on campus. The stadium is home to many memories of last second wins. If you are a fan of college football it should be on your list of stadiums to visit.

History of Neyland Stadium

The foundations of the stadium started long ago back in 1919 and was called Shields-Watkins field after the Col. W.S. Shields who was at the time the president of City National Bank in Knoxville. He was also a UT trustee and provided the initial capital for the building of the project. 2 years later in March of 1921 the stadium was completed. The name is shared with his wife Alice Watkins-Shields.

The name Neyland comes from the legendary coach General Neyland who was at the helm of the football program from 1926-1952. General Neyland came to UT as an ROTC instructor and started out as the backfield coach for the football program. During his tenure the Vols saw a lot of success as they were SEC champions in 1938, 1939, 1940, 1946 and 1951 along with 4 national championships.

During his 21 year career Neyland’s record was 173-31-12.

More About Neyland Stadium

Unfortunately, at this time tours of the stadium are unavailable. You can find more information about tours/events here. You can always buy a ticket to a game and see for yourself the amazing heritage Volunteer football has.

As the popularity and success of the football team increase so did the renovations and increased seat capacity. Here is a breakdown of the timeline of improvents.

YEARADDITIONCAPACITY CHANGETOTAL CAPACITY
1921Original West Stands3,200 seats3,200
1926East Stands3,600 seats6,800
1929West Stands11,060 seats17,860
1937North Section X1,500 seats19,360
1938East Stands12,030 seats31,390
1948South Stands15,000 seats46,390
1962West Upper Deckpress box, 5,837 seats52,227
1966North Stands5,895 seats58,122
1968East Upper Deck6,307 seats64,429
1972Southwest Upper Deck6,221 seats70,650
1976Southeast Upper Deck9,600 seats80,250
1980North Standsnet gain 10,999 seats91,249
1987West Executive Suites42 suites91,110
1990Student Seating Adjustment792 seats91,902
1996North Upper Deck10,642 seats102,544
1997ADA Seating Adjustment310 seats102,854
2000East Executive Suites78 suites104,079
2006East Club SeatsClub Level102,037

Need another great idea for an adventure in Knoxville? Check out Navitat Knoxville.

How to Get There

Neyland Stadium is located at 1300 Phillip Fulmer Way, Knoxville, TN 37916.

From McGhee Tyson Airport: Turn north on U.S. Highway 129 leaving airport. After crossing the Tennessee River bridge just outside of Knoxville, exit onto Neyland Drive (Tennessee Highway 153). Turn left (south) at the bottom of the exit ramp and follow road until Thompson-Boling Arena is visible. Turn left onto Lake Loudoun Boulevard. Turn right at stoplight. Follow Phillip Fulmer Way to stadium area.

From I-40 east (from Nashville) and I-75 north (from Chattanooga): Follow I-40 and I-75 to I-40/I-75 junction in west Knoxville. Continue on I-40 east to U.S. Highway 129 south. Follow 129 south to the exit for Neyland Drive (Tennessee Highway 153). Turn left (south) at the bottom of the exit ramp and follow the road until Thompson-Boling Arena is visible. Turn left onto Lake Loudoun Boulevard. Turn right at stoplight. Follow Phillip Fulmer Way to stadium area.

From I-40 west (from Asheville, N.C.): (updated for I-40 construction) Follow I-40 west to the Hall of Fame Drive. Take a left at the top of the exit and follow Hall of Fame Drive to the Neyland Drive exit (Tennessee Highway 153). Follow Neyland Drive until Thompson-Boling Arena is visible. Turn right onto Lake Loudoun Boulevard. Turn right at stoplight. Follow Phillip Fulmer Way to stadium area.

From I-75 south (from Lexington, Ky.): Follow I-75 south to I-275 south just past Merchants Road. Follow I-275 to I-40 east. Exit I-40 east onto James White Parkway and follow Parkway to Neyland Drive (Tennessee Highway 153) until Thompson-Boling Arena is visible. Turn right onto Lake Loudoun Boulevard. Turn right at stoplight. Follow Phillip Fulmer Way to stadium area.

Conclusion

When the days grow shorter and the air turns colder, you can find the Vol faithful screaming at the top of their lungs as they cheer their team to victory. The history of Neyland stadium is rich and its future looks even brighter. If you are in town on a Saturday in the fall come check out a game. You won’t be disappointed.

Getting ready for a tailgate party of your own and need to clean out the garage and looking for a dumpster rental company? Give us a call.

865-217-6862